https://wiscmail.wisc.edu/iwc/svc/wmap/attach/hurst-flyer.jpg?token=ZJqtFPCKgA&mbox=INBOX&uid=283242&number=2&type=image&subtype=jpeg&process=html%2Cjs%2Clink%2Ctarget%2Cbinhex

This year at West Madison, Horticulture professor Julie Dawson planted trials of several
species of vegetables with a particular focus on flavor, with varieties selected by plant breeders at UW Madison and by seed companies with organic seed offerings for direct-market growers.

They have beets, carrots, onion, lettuce, hot and sweet peppers, melons, winter squash, cabbage, tomato, potato and sweet corn in collaboration with plant breeders at UW Madison and the West Madison demonstration gardens.

Field days are each month from 3-5 pm. Participants will tour a breeding nursery or larger trial each time, and also look at all the crops in the demonstration gardens and do a taste test.

  • Wednesday August 27th: tomatoes, sweet corn, melons, peppers
  • Monday September 22nd: beets, carrots, onions, tomatoes
  • Tuesday October 21st: potatoes, winter squash, carrots

All the field days will be held at the West Madison Agricultural Research Station 8502 Mineral Point Rd, Verona WI 53593, universitydisplaygardens.com.

For more information and to receive information on project results, contact Julie Dawson,
Department of Horticulture, dawson@hort.wisc.edu.

Remember the talk about a trade association for regional food? the Local Food Association, based in Lexington, KY,  is organizing just such a service! The director bio is awesome and they have a great board of directors. They are hosting a first conference November 6th for supply chain businesses, including farmers / shippers, to meet and do business.

http://www.infoinc.com/LFA/0814.html

For all of you working to recreate our food system, I thought you might enjoy this short piece by Kate Clancy. She discusses the promise of the collective impact process to change complex systems.

Clancy, K. (2014). Food system governance. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 4 (2), 3–6. http://dx.doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2014.042.012

The five conditions of collective impact:

  • Common Agenda
  • Shared Measurement
  • Mutually Reinforcing Activities\
  • Continuous Communication
  • Backbone Support

 

The 2014 Wisconsin Hazelnut Field Day will be held this Saturday, August 23, at Emancipation Acres near Stoughton, WI.  Please visit: http://www.midwesthazelnuts.org/upcoming-events.html  for all the details.  Pre-registration is not required, but is appreciated.

The harvest season for wild ginseng, one of Wisconsin’s valuable natural resources, opens September 1.  There are regulations and guidelines in place for sustainable harvest and sale of wild ginseng.   Learn about this unique plant and the legal harvest from DNR experts Tuesday, August 19 at noon. Join the conversation on the DNR website or through the DNR Facebook page. You can take part in the conversation by clicking the “Cover it Live Chat” box on the left side of our Facebook page, or by going to our website (http://dnr.wi.gov/) and clicking the graphic there.

Thanks to all who made the dance a great success.  We estimate about 200 people turned out to dance, talk, bid on the silent auction and enjoy the beautiful country evening. We are posting photos on Flickr and the CIAS facebook page . Send us your photos from that night and help us tag dancers!

A parting thought from Janet Parker — we need to do this more often!

 

Date: July 10, 2014, 9am-5pm

Location: New Lisbon, WI

This workshop will add to your existing knowledge of pest management for grapes and add to your repertoire of knowledge about spotted wing drosopliha and how to calibrate your sprayers.

  • Gain hands-on experience in scouting for the major grape pests
  • Learn in-field/in-vineyard scouting techniques for major and minor pests of grapes, including flea beetle, grape berry moth, anthracnose, phomopsis, black rot, powdery mildew and downy mildew
  • Learn how to determine thresholds for each of the main pests
  • Discuss options for managing each major pest using organic and non-organic pesticides as well as cultural and biological management options
  • Collaboratively build management plans for the host vineyard and its pests
  • Learn how to calibrate your sprayers

This unique, innovative program provides an intensive, full-day applied workshop including hands-on demonstrations as well as team scouting opportunities.

Registration for the workshop is limited to 40 participants on a first come, first served basis. This class size allows for active discussion and interaction with course instructors. Registration fees cover course materials, refreshments and lunch.

Field guides will be available for purchase during the workshop.

This workshop is a collaborative effort between the UW-Madison Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems and UW-Extension.

Registration questions? Contact Regina Hirsch at 608-335-7755 or rmhirsch@wisc.edu.

 

http://www.cias.wisc.edu/beginning-and-advanced-ipm-practices-for-vineyards/

CIAS and USDA-AMS transportation division just released our report: Networking Across the Supply Chain http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/AgTransportation  We are continuing this work, hoping to host a meeting next spring in Chicago for the logistics and transportation sector. If you are working on freight transportation and values-based food supply chains, I would love to hear your thinking on this.

I’ve also been working with the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters on a report we released last Friday: “Climate Forward: A new roadmap for Wisconsin’s climate and energy fuuture” https://www.wisconsinacademy.org/sites/default/files/ClimateForward2014.pdf  The Academy will continue its work on this area into 2015. We hope to link CIAS faculty, students, staff and our many community partners (that means YOU) to it through our work on perennializing agriculture.

 

Watching farm trucks pull into the Capital Square farmers market can make one wonder how to get regional food to regional markets more efficiently. Driftless farm and food businesses like Driftless Organics, Morningside Orchard, 5th Season and Organic Valley work hard to figure out how to engage with green transportation options to get their products to Minneapolis, Madison, Milwaukee, even Chicago. Logistics, labor regulations, congestion, docking arrangements make this all very complex.

In April, 2010 CIAS convened a Driftless Food and Farm meeting where some of the participants broke out to discuss transportation and logistics. Compared to some of the other topic groups, this group was at relatively early stages of thinking, planning and doing. People in the region were working independently, but were increasingly ready to organize. This part of the food supply chain offers opportunity to grow and diversify the local economy much like other parts of the chain, but the way forward is less clear than it is with bricks-and-mortar projects. There is a strong interest in maintaining a vision of sustainability in the development of new systems.

The topic group identified these next steps:

  • Who in the region can provide leadership for this work? What is necessary for them to build capacity to take on that leadership? Where do we find that support?
  • What is the most appropriate scale to work with? Local, county, multi-county, state, etc.?
  • Where could the region find industry expertise, if only to understand what questions yet need to be answered in thinking about distribution and logistics?
  • How do we build awareness with farmers about the role that this part of the food supply chain plays and the associated costs / savings of working in moving beyond direct marketing into a wholesale model?

CIAS is pleased to report on progress made to address some of these questions.In 2011 and 2012, CIAS made important connections to freight engineering research center on campus – CFIRE – and supported a group of students to understand what issues we face in moving high-value local food to regional markets. Rosa Kozub, Lindsey Day-Farnsworth, David Nelson, Ben Zeitlow, Peter Allen, and Rachel Murray, along with Teresa Adams, Alfonso Morales, and Ernie Perry all worked with CIAS to crack this nut.

In February 2013, CIAS teamed up with USDA-Agricultural Marketing Service’s transportation division to offer the meeting “Networking Across the Supply Chain: Transportation Innovations for Local and Regional Food Systems“. More than 100 participants – the majority of whom had business interests in this topic – participated and shared their expertise.

June 2014 USDA-AMS and UW-CIAS released a report that describes what happened at this meeting and our best thinking to date on some of the fundamental questions facing the local food movement. To view a summary of the meeting, go to: http://www.scribd.com/doc/231458906  Emergent strategies that we’ve documented include:

  • strengthen regional supply chains by helping like-minded businesses find one another, and provide a venue for business communication and supply chain governance;
  • improve logistics at the region level, recognizing that LTL freight requires terminal markets that can de-aggregate products and TL freight, especially around metro regions, may benefit from innovative infrastructure investments; and
  • investigate multi-modal and dual purpose approaches to increase efficiencies

We now have a nimble team of researchers, staff and students on campus with growing expertise on supply chain development for regional food. Thanks to all who participated in the six Driftless Food and Farm meetings who helped shape subsequent investigations and whose input resulted in research with real-world usefulness.

Next Steps

CIAS, CFIRE, the Center for Coops and the State Smart Transportation Innitiative (a project of another UW campus research center – COWS)  are working together with Organic Logistics, the Wisconsin Local Foods Hub, Fresh Taste, and other partners to take this work to the next level. We are writing proposals to vet some of the emergent ideas with stakeholders and further engage the region in creating the world we envision.

Watch for further updates as we make progress. And please let us know what you think of our work in this topic area, at any time.

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